Lactation

Help Support The Global Big Latch On

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For the past 8 years Health Foundations Birth Center has had the honor of being a site for supporting the Big Latch On. The Big Latch On is a global movement to raise awareness and provide support to breastfeeding mothers. This year we are very excited to be partnering with Blooma for this wonderful event. Global Big Latch On events take place at registered locations around the world.

Some of the goals of the Big Latch On are: 

  • Provide support for communities to identify and grow opportunities to provide on-going breastfeeding support and promotion in local communities.
  • Raise awareness of breastfeeding support and knowledge available locally and globally.
  • Help communities positively support breastfeeding in public places.
  • Make breastfeeding as normal part of day-to-day life at a local community level.
  • Increase support for women who breastfeed - women are supported by their partners, family and their communities.
  • Ensure communities have the resources to advocate for coordinated appropriate and accessible breastfeeding support services.

Last year the total attendance was 50,383 people! 

We would love you to be a part of this movement with us. This year we are participating on August 3rd starting at 10:00am. Please sign up here! We will be having snacks and handing out goodie bags. Blooma will be leading a Bring Your Own Baby Yoga Class right after the latch on.

Top Five Breastfeeding Essentials for the First Two Weeks Postpartum

 photo credit: Meredith Westin

photo credit: Meredith Westin

Breastfeeding is a journey, both beautiful and challenging at times. To help ease the first two weeks of your postpartum we have put together a list of items that will hopefully make things easier!

Motherlove Nipple Cream: Nipple cream is essential, especially in the early days. Your baby will want to nurse very frequently. Even with a great latch, it takes some time for your nipples to get used to this. Put nipple cream on your nipples after each feeding. No need to wipe it off before feeding your baby.

Nursing Bra / Tank: You will want to have these before your baby is born. It can be helpful to get sized; after 36 weeks is a good time for this. During the first two weeks of postpartum you will find yourself living in your nursing tank!  It is easy and you don't have to put anything else on. Nursing tanks are supportive to your breasts and you can find ones that also support your postpartum tummy. I recommend having 2-3 of both nursing tanks and nursing bras.

Medela Hydrogel Pads: Hydrogel pads are a serious life saver for sore, cracked nipples. After about 24 hours your nipples will feel much better if they are cracked or very sore. In saying this, if you find yourself with very sore, cracked or bleeding nipples, be sure to contact a lactation specialist. It is normal for a little bit of soreness. If you are wincing in pain when it is time for a feeding, this is not normal.

Nursing Pads: Once your milk is in, you may find that your breasts are leaking milk. Whether you are nursing on one side and the other side begins to leak or if you have a let down when your baby is not feeding, you will want nursing pads in your bra at all times. There are washable and disposable options; get both.

Resources: I cannot stress how important good resources are during the early days of breastfeeding. Maybe it is your mom, sister or a good friend, someone to talk to on rough days, and someone with breastfeeding experience. Choose one or two people to reach out to for advice otherwise too much advice can be overwhelming. Never hesitate to reach out to a lactation consultant if you need help with latch or have production issues. A great website to turn to is www.kellymom.com

A nursing station can be very helpful as well. You can prepare this before your baby arrives so it will be ready to go when you get home. Get a basket to set next to your bed and fill with snacks, water, a couple of diapers, wipes and a good book!

 

Breastfeeding? Going Back to Work? Here is What You Need to Know

If you’re like most working moms, you might be feeling anxious about returning to work after the birth of your little one. Adding pumping and bottles into the mix can seem downright overwhelming. You might be wondering how you will fit pumping sessions into your schedule or maybe you are concerned about maintaining your breast milk supply. Although it may be a challenge to adjust to your new routine, you can be successful and find balance with a little pre-planning. The following are some basic tips to get you started.

Supplies: There are some very handy supplies available to pumping moms. Try and stock up on these things ahead of time to relieve some stress when going back work.

  • Electric Breast Pump: Most insurance plans cover breast pumps. Call your insurance company and find out where to get yours. This can be done before you have your baby.
  • Easy Expression Bustier Hands-Free Pumping Bra by Medela: This bra is very convenient whether you are pumping at home or at work. It allows you to easily pump both breasts at the same time while giving you time to read a book, browse the internet or take a little "me" time while you pump.
  • Extra Breast Pump Supplies: Supplies can get lost or broken which is inconvenient when you need to pump, keep a few extras on hand:
    • Replacement Membranes
    • Connectors
    • Breast Shields
  • Breast Milk Storage Bags: You will want to keep a box of these on hand in your breast pump bag.

Maintaining Your Milk Supply: Are you concerned about your milk supply decreasing when you head back to work?  The following are ways to increase and keep your supply strong.

  • Eat good protein rich meals and snacks.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Try a supplement such as Motherlove More Milk Plus.  Take 2 capsules, three times a day.
  • On working days, make time to pump approximately every three hours.
  • During evenings, nights and weekends breastfeed your baby on demand.
  • Eliminate other things that could decrease your milk supply, such as:
    • Peppermint or Sage Tea
    • Decongestants
    • Parsley

Storing and Thawing: It is important that you know how to safely store and thaw your breast milk and that the person taking care of your baby knows too.

  • When pumping at work keep your bags of milk in the storage section of your breast pump bag with an ice-pack. If you do not have that kind of pump, bring a small cooler with you to store your milk.
  • Once home, place milk in the fridge. It is okay to keep in the fridge for 72 hours. If the milk hasn’t been used by then, put it in the freezer. Breast milk is safe to store in the freezer for 6 months.
  • Remember to always label each bag with the date, time and quantity.
  • When thawing or warming up the milk, never microwave it. This destroys the nutrients. Put the bag or bottle of milk into a bowl of very warm water.

If you would like to learn more about pumping and returning to work, come to our class PumpTalk 101 with Jan Kaste, IBCLC. This class is taught every first Thursday of the month at 3:30pm. It is $10. To sign up, contact our office 651-895-2520. Health Foundations Birth Center also offers lactation visits during the week and many other services to help with your breastfeeding needs.

The supplies mentioned above can be found on our on-line store, as well as our PumpTalk 101 Kit. This kit contains the pumping essentials at a great price! Get yours here.

Banana Bread for Healthy Lactation

This banana bread recipe promotes healthy lactation in nursing mamas. Some of these ingredients are known for increasing milk supply.  The milk boosting ingredients are highlighted. Enjoy warm with some butter!

Ingredients

  • 2 TBS Flaxseed Meal
  • 4 TBS Water
  • 1 ¾ C Flour
  • 1 ¼ C Oats
  • Dash of Salt
  • 1 tsp Baking Soda
  • 4 TBS Brewer’s Yeast
  • 1 tsp Ground Fenugreek
  • ½ tsp Cinnamon
  • ½ C Softened Butter
  • 3 Eggs
  • 1 C Sugar or ¾ C Maple Syrup
  • 3 Medium Mashed Bananas (the riper the better!)
  • 2 TBS Milk
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ C Chopped Pecans or Walnuts (optional)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 and grease a 10-inch loaf pan. Mix dry ingredients together first then blend in all other ingredients. Bake for 50-60 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center of the bread. Let cool and remove from pan.

Super Purple Lactation Smoothie

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Start your day with this yummy Lactation Smoothie! The ingredients chosen for this recipe are great for boosting your milk supply! If you are dairy free, you can add some almond milk or coconut milk instead of greek yogurt. 

1 Large Banana

1 Cup of Blueberries

1 Cup of Strawberries

1 Tsp of Flax Meal

1 Tsp of Brewer's Yeast

Drizzle of Honey

Handful of Spinach

1 Heaping Tablespoon of Plain Greek Yogurt

Combine all ingredients in your favorite blender, blend until smooth and ENJOY!

Boost Your Milk Supply With No-Bake Lactation Oatmeal Bites

No oven required for this delicious unbaked treat. Full of galactagogues, which are known for increasing milk supply, these yummy No-Bake Lactation bites are sure to be a quick and easy snack that the whole family will enjoy. 

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of oats (old fashioned or instant)
  • ½ cup of peanut butter or other nut butter of choice
  • ½ cup of honey
  • 1 cup of coconut flakes
  • ½ cup of ground flax seed
  • ½ cup of mini chocolate chips
  • 3 tablespoons of brewer’s yeast
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together
  2. Refrigerate for one half hour
  3. Roll into bite-sized balls
  4. Roll balls in coconut flakes 
  5. Enjoy!
  6. (Store leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator)

Recipe transcribed from: TeenToddlerNewborn.com

Introducing Your Breastfed Baby to the Bottle

Baby Feeding on Bottle

Whether you will be returning to work after your maternity leave or would like to get your partner more involved in feeding your new babe, introducing a bottle to your breastfed baby can be a helpful, and sometimes tricky, endeavor. Many women like to have the option to have pumped milk available that a family member or caregiver can give the baby should they need a break, some extra sleep or happen to be away for more than a couple hours. Here are 5 helpful tips to introducing your breastfed baby to the bottle so that it’s a smooth and gentle transition for you both.

5 Tips to Introduce Your Breastfed Baby to the Bottle

  1. Timing is everything: Your midwife or lactation consultant will likely tell you that introducing any sort of bottle or artificial soother must be well-timed. Too early, and you run the risk of disrupting your newly established breastfeeding routine and too late, your babe may reject the bottle all together. The ideal time to introduce a bottle is between 4-6 weeks. That way, you will have already found your groove with breastfeeding and your baby will likely not experience any nipple confusion. 
  2. Choose a slow flow nipple: When picking out a bottle and nipple for your baby, choose one that most closely mimics the breast and allows for a slow flow of milk. Sucking from a bottle requires a different latch and tongue movement than suckling from the breast. A slow flow nipple will most closely replicate the experience of breastfeeding and allow baby to take his time eating. 
  3. Have your partner give the bottle: Getting a bottle from mom who usually breastfeeds can be confusing and frustrating for a little one. If possible, have your partner be the bottle aficionado. Even better yet, take the time that your partner is learning to bottle feed your baby and do something for yourself. Take a shower, take a nap, go for a walk or run an errand. Your baby is more likely to have a successful bottle feeding experience if they can’t smell mom and her milk nearby. 
  4. Take baby steps: Rather than having your partner or family member offer the bottle when your baby is hungry, try introducing it after they have breastfed. This way, they will not be frustrated as easily with the process and can explore the feel of the bottle without the pressure of needing to satiate their appetite. You don’t need to put a lot of breastmilk in the bottle, even starting with a half an ounce should suffice. If the milk is not freshly pumped, place the bottle in warm water to heat it prior to feeding. Baby may be more likely to accept a warm bottle versus milk that is directly from the refrigerator. 
  5. Encourage paced feeding: One of the challenges with bottle feeding is that we decide how much baby should drink rather than baby deciding. To most closely simulate the experience of breastfeeding, never force the nipple into baby’s mouth and simply allow him to decide how much he wishes to drink. Give baby breaks for burping and rest and switch sides from which you feed him as he would when breastfeeding. It’s also important to make sure your partner or the caregiver is able to recognize baby’s hungers cues so that he or she can feed baby when he’s hungry versus on a set schedule. 

Introducing bottle feeding does not have to be a stressful process if approached slowly, gently and with plenty of time for practice. If you have questions about the process of introducing a bottle to your breastfed baby or are pregnant and considering a natural birth in a homelike setting, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife and for a tour of our Birth Center. We are here to support you throughout your journey of motherhood.

Boost Your Milk Supply With No-Bake Lactation Oatmeal Bites

No Bake Lactation Bites

No oven required for this delicious unbaked treat. Full of galactagogues, which are known for increasing milk supply, these yummy No-Bake Lactation bites are sure to be a quick and easy snack that the whole family will enjoy. 

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of oats (old fashioned or instant)
  • ½ cup of peanut butter or other nut butter of choice
  • ½ cup of honey
  • 1 cup of coconut flakes
  • ½ cup of ground flax seed
  • ½ cup of mini chocolate chips
  • 3 tablespoons of brewer’s yeast
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together
  2. Refrigerate for one half hour
  3. Roll into bite-sized balls
  4. Roll balls in coconut flakes 
  5. Enjoy!
  6. (Store leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator)

Recipe transcribed from: TeenToddlerNewborn.com

 

Infant Hunger Cues - A Simple Guide to Baby's Hunger

Infant Hunger Cues

Wouldn’t it be nice if newborns came with an instruction manual? One of the more challenging feats as a new parent is learning your baby’s various hunger cues and how to catch them before tummy rumbles turn to tears. Initial signs that your baby is hungry may be subtle and easy to miss if you don’t know what you are looking for. Here’s a simple guide to breaking down the stages of baby’s hunger cues and what to do if baby becomes upset before you notice them.

Early Hunger Cues:

Your newborn is not likely to raise his hand and ask for the breast or bottle when he is feeling hungry. There are, however, some early indicators to look for that may suggest he needs to be fed. Early hunger cues include waking from sleep, stirring, turning of the head, lip smacking, opening and closing the mouth and rooting or seeking the breast. The rooting reflex, for the new parents out there, is a baby’s automatic tendency to turn his head toward the stimulus and make sucking motions with his mouth when the lips or cheeks are touched. This is a natural reflex that helps with the process of breastfeeding. If you see baby displaying any of these cues, offer the breast or a bottle.

Mid Hunger Cues:

If you miss the first set of cues (which can easily happen when you are just learning), the second set of more active cues may be more noticeable. Babies who are beginning to feel frustrated and hungry may display increased physical movement such as fidgeting, stretching, rooting around the chest of whoever is holding them, positioning themselves for nursing, fussing, fast-paced breathing or putting their hand, toy, clothes or just about anything in their mouth. If your baby has reached this stage of hunger, offer a bottle or the breast as soon as possible.

Late Hunger Cues:

Responding to late hunger cues is when it gets a little trickier. Every new parent has missed the early and mid-cues at least once and found themselves having to soothe an inconsolable baby. If your baby has reached this point of frustration and hunger they will begin to cry, move their head frantically from side to side, turn red and display signs that they are agitated and distressed. At this point, you will need to comfort your baby before feeding them in order to have a successful nursing or bottle feeding. 

Try calming your baby by cuddling him, having skin-to-skin contact, wearing him, singing to him, rocking, bouncing or even taking a warm bath together. Once your baby has calmed down, offer the breast or bottle. Although it will likely happen to even the most attentive parent from time to time, you want to avoid reaching this stage of hunger to the best of your ability. Once baby has reached this stage of agitation, he is more likely to have a poor latch, feel overly tired, eat less and wake sooner for the next feeding. Routinely letting your baby reach this stage of hunger and distress can result in feeding problems and poor attachment.

A good rule of thumb in the early days is-- when in doubt, feed baby. For breastfed babies offering the breast frequently and for comfort in addition to hunger will only help increase your milk supply and develop a strong and lasting bond with your baby. For bottle fed babies, feeding with love and attentiveness is also a great way to strengthen your attachment and nurture your bond with baby. If you have questions about hunger cues, nursing your baby or any and all things related to pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife and for a tour of our Birth Center

*Special note for bottle feeders*

With bottle feeding, it is also important to look for signs that your baby has had enough. These signs include turning the head away, refusing to suck and becoming fidgety or frustrated. Just as it is important to be aware of hunger cues, it is also important to respect signs that your baby is full and let him take the lead on how much he eats. This will help prevent overfeeding baby.

Baby Friendly Activities for New Moms

Baby Friendly Exercises

Being a new mom can be isolating at times. Even though you are home and loving snuggling up to the new love of your life, you may also be itching to get out of the house and interact with other adults! The good news is that there are so many activities available now for moms and babies in the community. From swim and exercise classes to play groups and mom and baby yoga, with a little effort to get out of the house, you and your baby can be social butterflies in no time. Here’s a list of ideas and local options for new moms in the Twin Cities.

  • Breastfeeding Support Groups: Breastfeeding support groups are a great first social activity for mom and baby as you will find the littlest of little babies at these gatherings and you can gain valuable help and knowledge from a lactation consultant. This is a great way to get help with baby’s latch or transitioning off the nipple shield and many other breastfeeding challenges that may arise. You are also usually able to do pre and post-feed weigh-ins to determine how many ounces your baby is getting per nursing session. Here are some local options for moms looking to connect with other nursing moms.
  • Mom and Baby Yoga: Mom and baby yoga is another wonderful bonding activity for you and your little one in those early months. Most mom and baby classes are open to babies as young as 8 weeks of age and involve small motions for baby that can aid in digestion, sleep and soothing while providing a relaxing way for mom to distress. Mom and baby yoga classes are anything goes as far as breastfeeding, diaper changes and crying babes, so do not worry if your baby isn’t having a ‘Zen’ day. Check out these locations for mom and baby yoga classes in the community.
  • Story Time: You are never too young for the joy of reading. You may have even read to your baby in the womb! Now that your little one is here, baby story times are a great way to get out of the house, meet other moms and enjoy a story or two with your baby.
  • Baby Signing Classes: Baby signing classes are a great way to jump start excellent communication between you and your baby. Although your baby may not be able to return sign with you until 8 or 9 months, they understand well before they are able to communicate. The earlier you begin signing with your baby, the earlier he will be able to communicate his needs to you. Baby signing is associated with earlier ability to communicate, decreased crying and even possibly a few extra IQ points down the road. Here are a few options for baby sign language classes in your area:
  • Music Classes: What better way to connect with your sweet baby than through music, movement and play. Music classes offer the opportunity to expose you baby to different sounds, songs and instruments as well as meet other moms and babies in your community. There are a few great options for music classes in the community including:
  • Swim Classes: Parent and baby swim classes are the perfect opportunity to expose your baby to the water for the first time and begin to learn some basic safety skills like back floating, flipping over from back to front and brief submersion. Most swim schools will allow you to take your first parent and baby swim class around 6 months. Typically the classes will be short to accommodate baby’s needs but will allow time for some simple instruction, games and singing. It is never too early to begin educating yourself and your child on water safety. Here are a few options for baby swim classes in the area:
  • Baby Friendly Exercise Classes: Once you’ve been cleared by your midwife or OB for exercise, you may be wondering how in the world you will find time to work out with a baby. Fear not though, there are actually many options these days for the moms who love fitness. From stroller exercise groups to babywearing barre,  these are fitness classes where moms can actually bring baby along for the ride while she gets her sweat on! Here are just a few options in the area:
  • Mom’s Groups: Lastly, mom groups are a real thing these days. They are born on Facebook, Meetup.com, through churches, birth centers and friend groups alike. Some mom groups are brought together by certain parenting philosophies or interests and others are created simply by location. Whatever the theme or lack thereof, joining a local mom group will be one of the best things you can do in that first year of being a mom to connect with other moms who are going through the same phase of life and have children that are the same age as yours. These moms will become your buddies, the ones you can talk poop and breastfeeding with without batting an eyelash. Their kids will be your kids’ playmates and hopefully your spouses will even get to know one another during family activities. There are many ways to get involved in a local moms’ group but here are just a few ideas.

As you can see, although you may feel as though you’ve been one with your couch and the Boppy pillow since baby was born, there are MANY options for you and your little one to get out of the house and connect with other new moms and babies. Give different types of activities a try to see what works for you and your baby. Try out a couple different mom groups until you find your people. Being a new parent is one of the most exciting, wonderful, terrifying things you have likely ever gone through. Why not make a few friends to join you on the journey?

For questions about natural birth, pregnancy, postpartum opportunities, classes and more, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife and for a tour of our Birth Center.

Chicken Barley Soup for Lactation

Chicken Barley Soup For Lactation

After giving birth and amidst the exhaustion of caring for a newborn, comfort foods may be all you want. Try this delicious chicken soup recipe that is not only healthy and rich in protein and vitamins, but will also give your lactation a boost!

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 cup of button mushrooms
  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 cups of baby potatoes, cut into small pieces
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 cups of vegetable broth
  • 1 cup of water
  • ½ cup of pearl barley, rinsed under cold water
  • 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into cubes
  • 1 cup of frozen peas

Directions:

  1. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add oil and onion. Cook until onion softens, approximately 3 minutes.
  2. Add mushrooms, carrots, potatoes and garlic. Cook until mushrooms are soft, approximately 3 minutes.
  3. Add broth, water and barley. Boil and then reduce heat to medium-low.
  4. Simmer covered until barley is tender for approximately 25 minutes.
  5. Stir in chicken and peas until chicken is cooked through, approximately 10 minutes.
  6. Enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: Today's Parent

Your Six-Week Postpartum Visit - What to Expect

Midwife Postpartum Visit

Whether you give birth at a birth center with midwives or at the hospital with your OBGYN, you will likely have a postpartum follow up appointment about six weeks after you deliver. The purpose of the visit is to check on your physical and emotional well-being as you recover and adjust to your new life post childbirth. Here’s what you can expect to happen at your six-week postpartum check-up. 

NOTE: Health Foundations also provides a postpartum visit at 2 weeks for our families

A thorough assessment of how your body is recovering from childbirth: 

Your midwife or doctor will likely check the size of your uterus to see if it has returned to its pre-pregnancy size. She or he will also want to ensure that any vaginal tearing or C-section incisions are healing well, and assess for any post-birth physical problems like hemorrhoids, incontinence or constipation. Now’s the time to mention any other aches and pains you are experiencing. Your care provider will likely also clear you for sex and exercise at this visit should everything check out okay.

A check-in on your mental health: 

Your care provider may give you a written assessment for postpartum depression or she may just evaluate how you are feeling in discussion. Postpartum mood disorders affect approximately 10-15 percent of all new moms though many feel ashamed or afraid to seek the necessary help. If you are experiencing symptoms of depression such as hopelessness, sadness, anger or thoughts of harming yourself or your baby, please tell your care provider right away so they can support you in finding the appropriate help. There are many options for moms experiencing postpartum depression or anxiety including counseling, support groups and even medication. Your postpartum visit is a great opportunity to share any concerns about your mental well-being with your care provider.

A discussion about birth control:

Since you’ll most likely be cleared to resume having sexual intercourse with your partner at this visit, your care provider will probably want to discuss options for birth control. While exclusive breastfeeding can provide effective protection for the first six months postpartum and sometimes beyond, you may want to consider a back-up plan such as the mini-pill or an IUD if you don’t want to risk your kids being too close in age. Your midwife or OBGYN can discuss the various options for birth control with you and help you come up with a plan that works for you.

Your annual gynecological exam:

Many practitioners will go ahead and perform your annual exam at your six-week postpartum visit. She may conduct a pelvic exam, Pap smear and breast exam in addition to the usual physical exam measures such as weight and blood pressure. It’s a good time to discuss any other health concerns you have so be sure to bring a list of questions with you to the appointment. 

A breastfeeding consultation:

Your midwife or OBGYN will check in with you to see how breastfeeding is going with your new babe. They can help you troubleshoot any difficulties, address issues with engorgement or clogged ducts and refer you to a lactation consultant if you need additional guidance or support. 

Your postpartum visit is a great time to address any questions or concerns that you are having about your recovery, physical or mental health or adjustment to caring for a newborn. Be sure to come prepared with your questions written down so that you can make the most of the time with your care provider. At Health Foundations, our care doesn’t end in the birthing room. We are here for you during your postpartum period and beyond to support you and your new family as you adjust to motherhood. For questions about natural birth or postpartum care, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife and for a tour of our Birth Center.

Lactation Services at Health Foundations

Breastfeeding Mama

If you’re expecting your first baby and are planning to breastfeed, you likely have images in your head of lovingly nursing your newborn in your new cushy glider as he drifts off to sleep and you gaze down in awe of your little miracle. You probably have these images because that’s how we often see breastfeeding portrayed in photos and movies. Breastfeeding is a beautiful, natural way to nourish your baby while creating a lasting bond. But it’s unfortunately not always as easy as you expect. Problems such as a poor latch and lip and tongue ties can leave both you and your baby in tears as you struggle to overcome the learning curve on your way to nursing bliss. That’s why, at Health Foundations, we offer comprehensive lactation services to get you on your way to building a successful breastfeeding relationship with your new baby.

Crying Baby.jpg

Lactation consultation can begin as soon as your baby is born with guidance and instruction from our team on how to get baby latched on properly and receiving the vital colostrum that precedes your milk coming in. But it doesn’t end there. During your postpartum visit, our registered nurse Jan Kaste will answer any questions you have about breastfeeding, address any difficulties that have arisen, and troubleshoot any problems to ensure that you and baby can get back on track. 

“Nursing is a learned skill that often benefits from time spent with a lactation consultant. We offer lactation education on a one to one basis to get new moms through those first challenging weeks. Reassurance and individualized problem solving create the best chance for each mom to successfully reach her breastfeeding goals.” –Jan Kaste, RN, Nurse Practitioner.

If you’re breastfeeding challenges are not resolved during your postpartum visit, you are welcome to schedule a one on one consultation at the Birth Center. During a lactation consultation, we will assess your concerns and give you the individualized attention, support and guidance needed to help you achieve your breastfeeding goals. It is not uncommon for it to take a month or even two to get in a comfortable groove with your baby as you both learn to navigate the rewarding and nutritive relationship of breastfeeding. 

In addition to private consultations, we also offer a number of classes and groups to support you in your breastfeeding journey. These options include:

Breastfeeding Class (First Wednesday and Third Tuesday of Every Month, 6:00-7:00 PM): This class focuses on getting off to a great start with a comfortable latch as well as understanding nursing positions and infant feeding cues. The class also covers nutrition for breastfeeding, breastfeeding supplies, and common concerns such as infant growth spurts.

Mama’s Milk Hour (Thursdays from 2:30-3:30 PM): This group is a wonderful way to gain support in breastfeeding in those early weeks.  Come weigh your baby, practice breastfeeding in public, ask questions and connect with other mamas. Free and open to the public.

Pump Talk 101 (First Thursday of Every Month from 3:30pm - 4:30pm): If you’re returning to work soon, this class will help you learn how to make the transition by teaching the ins and outs of pumping and storing milk after you return to your job.

To learn more about the lactation services, classes and groups at Health Foundations, contact us to speak to a lactation consultant. We are dedicated to helping you achieve your breastfeeding goals and supporting you on the way.