Pregnancy Nutrition

Is This Normal?!: Common Questions and Concerns During Pregnancy

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Along with excitement, pregnancy can bring many questions and concerns. Your body is changing rapidly. Each week seems to bring a new change; some delightful and some not! Most of the changes and symptoms are very normal. You may experience all of them or none at all. That is normal too! Below you will find common pregnancy discomforts, why they happen and a tip on how to help alleviate.

Round Ligament Pain: As your baby grows, your belly grows and with that, many women experience round ligament pain. It feels like sharp twinges/muscle pull usually on the right or left side of the lower uterus. The pain is usually relieved within a minute or two. Change positions to help and also massage the area with your hand. Chiropractic care can help if this is something that happens frequently. Also try sleeping with a pillow between your legs, this provides more uterine support.

Leg Cramps: Legs cramps are quite common in pregnancy and can occur in response to carrying extra weight, changes in circulation, or mineral deficiencies. These sudden, painful cramps in your legs may wake you in the middle of the night. Helpful treatments include:  walking daily, stretching your calf muscles regularly, wearing low healed shoes, and eating foods that are high in calcium and magnesium. A liquid calcium magnesium supplement can be great, discuss this with your healthcare provider.

Trouble Sleeping: Sleep disruptions start early on in pregnancy, usually beginning with having to urinate more frequently during the night. Getting comfortable can be troublesome as well. Along with this, changing hormones can cause your body to have trouble falling and/or staying asleep. Purchase a body pillow, this can help support your body physically. Some other things to try are: take an epsom salt bath before bed, add some lavender essential oil, exercise 30 minutes daily, avoid coffee and eat small meals throughout the day to keep your blood sugar level.

Constipation: Hormone changes slow down your bowels and can cause constipation. This is normal in pregnancy but there are things you can do to help. Drink 8-10 glasses of water per day, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables each day. A good calcium magnesium supplement can help with this too! 

Darkening of Complexion: ‘Chloasma’ or “mask of pregnancy” refers to darkened patches on your face. These dark patches tend to fade away few months after delivery. To try and help reduce the darkening, use sunscreen daily and wear a hat if you are in the direct sunlight.

Bleeding Gums: Bleeding gums are a common complaint in pregnancy. Most of it has to do with hormonal changes. These hormonal changes also make you more susceptible to bacteria in plaque so it is important to keep up with regular dental visits during pregnancy.

Nausea/Vomiting: Nausea and vomiting is common and normal in pregnancy. Again, it is due to hormones. For many women it starts around week 6 and tapers off at week 12. Other women may experience this symptom long after that or during their entire pregnancy. Drinking plenty of water and eating small frequent meals that include protein is a great way to stave off nausea. This is a symptom you should always share with your midwife or doctor in case your symptoms are severe.

Always consult with your provider before starting new supplements during pregnancy. 

Health Foundations Birth Center is a free-standing birth center in St. Paul, Minnesota. Our midwives provide integrative care for our families. We would love to have you come in and learn more about our services! Schedule a consult or tour today!

Cold and Flu Fighting Ginger Soup

This ginger soup in a great way to fight colds and the flu this season! It is a safe way to fight sickness during breastfeeding and pregnancy. 

Ingredients:

  • 2 inch piece of fresh garlic, sliced thin
  • 4 green onions, sliced thin
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • 3/4 cup of mushrooms, sliced
  • 6 cups of chicken bone broth or chicken stock

Instructions to Prepare:

Combine ginger, garlic and mushrooms in a pot with a small amount of the broth or stock. Simmer until the ingredients are softened. Add the rest of the broth or stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and continue to cook for 20-30 minutes. 

This soup can be stored in the fridge for a few days.

Enjoy and be well!

 

Make your Own Pizza with Quinoa Crust

Quinoa Pizza Crust Recipe

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup quinoa, covered by 1" of water and soaked for 6 - 8 hours (or overnight)
  • ¼ cup water
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions:

Soak the quinoa in water, covering it by at least 1", for 6 - 8 hours. Once you're ready to make the crust, preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line a 9" cake pan with parchment paper and drizzle one tablespoon of oil in the center. Spread around with your hands until evenly coated and set pan aside. Thoroughly rinse quinoa, then add to a blender. Add the ¼ cup of water, baking powder, salt and remaining olive oil, and blend on high until smooth and creamy. This should resemble a thick pancake batter. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake for 15 minutes. Remove, flip and return to oven baking for another 10 - 15 minutes until browned and edges are crispy. Top with sauce, cheese and any other toppings you'd like and bake for 12 - 15 minutes until cheese has melted and started to brown. Remove, let cool for a few minutes in the pan, transfer cutting board and slice. Garnish with herbs, pepper flakes, grated cheese, etc., and serve immediately!

Transcribed from: Alyssa Rimmer

Blueberry Lemon Poppy Seed Protein Muffins

Blueberry Lemon Poppyseed Protein Muffin
  • ½ cup + 2 tbsp (56g) coconut flour (measured correctly)
  • 2 scoops (84g) vanilla whey protein powder 
  • ¾ tsp baking powder
  • ¾ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp (8g) poppy seeds
  • 1 tbsp (5g) lemon zest (about one medium)
  • 1 tbsp (14g) coconut oil or unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
  • 1 large egg, room temperature
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup (60g) plain nonfat Greek yogurt
  • ¼ cup (60mL) agave syrup
  • 3 tbsp (45mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice (about one medium large)
  • ½ cup (120mL) unsweetened vanilla almond milk (or any milk)
  • 1 cup (140g) fresh blueberries

Preheat the oven to 350°F, and lightly coat 9 standard-sized muffin cups with nonstick cooking spray.

Whisk together the coconut flour, protein powder, xanthan gum, baking powder, baking soda, salt, poppy seeds, and lemon zest in a medium bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the coconut oil, egg, and vanilla. Stir in the Greek yogurt until no large lumps remain. Stir in the agave, lemon juice, and almond milk. Add in the coconut flour mixture, stirring until fully incorporated. Let the batter rest for 10 minutes. Gently fold in the blueberries.

Divide the batter between the prepared muffin cups. Bake at 350°F for 23-26 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before carefully turning out onto a wire rack.

Notes:

This recipe was specifically designed for whey protein powder. Most protein powders behave differently, especially when it comes to absorbing moisture. If you substitute a different whey-based protein powder than the one linked to in the recipe above, you may need to add more protein powder if the batter is too wet OR more milk if the batter is too dry. Do not substitute plant-based protein powder; it tends to be much more absorbent and will most likely result in dry, crumbly muffins.Frozen blueberries may be substituted for the fresh. To do so, reserve 1 tablespoon of the coconut flour and protein powder mixture from Step 2, and toss that with the frozen blueberries just before gently folding them into the batter. The baking time may increase by a few minutes.These muffins freeze really nicely. To thaw quickly, place individual muffins in the microwave for 40-50 seconds on 40% power.

Transcribed from: Amy’s Healthy Baking

Baked Chicken Parmesan Over Zucchini Noodles

Baked Chicken Parmesan

This recipe is perfect for a cozy evening inside as the weather gets cooler. What I love about this dish is that it is hearty and protein rich and the zucchini noodles get some veggies in! Feel free to substitute whole wheat pasta if you aren't a fan of zucchini. 

Ingredients

•    2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
•    1 tablespoon chopped
•    Fresh thyme
•    6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced and divided
•    1 shallot, thinly sliced
•    1 pound heirloom tomatoes, chopped
•    ½ cup dry white wine
•    ½ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
•    ½ teaspoon black pepper
•    2 eggs, lightly beaten
•    4 (4-ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast cutlets
•    1 teaspoon garlic powder
•    Cooking spray
•    4 medium zucchini
•    2 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, very thinly sliced ½ cup torn basil leaves, divided

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425°.
  • Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add thyme, 4 garlic cloves, and shallot; cook 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, wine, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper; cook 8 minutes or until liquid is reduced by half.
  • Sprinkle chicken cutlets with the garlic powder and place cutlets on a wire rack coated with cooking spray. Place rack on a baking sheet. Bake at 425° for 12 minutes or until done.
  • Using a julienne peeler, or a spiralizer, peel zucchini lengthwise into noodles or thin strips.
  • Preheat broiler to high. Top each cutlet evenly with mozzarella. Broil 2 minutes or until cheese is bubbly.
  • Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add remaining 2 garlic cloves; cook 1 minute. Add zucchini; cook 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Toss with sauce, remaining ¼ teaspoon salt, and half of basil.
  • Arrange ¾ cup zucchini noodles on each of 4 plates. Top each serving with 1 chicken portion; sprinkle servings evenly with remaining half of basil.

Recipe transcribed from: Betsy Life

15-Minute Pregnancy Chili

Pregnancy Chili

It is officially fall, mamas, and with fall comes cooler weather, changing leaves, football and chili! Here’s a super easy and quick recipe that calls for turkey instead of beef. It’s the perfect, simple dish for your pregnant belly and your family too!

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound of ground turkey
  • ½ cup of chopped onion
  • 16 ounces of pinto beans, drained and rinsed 
  • 28 ounces of chopped, stewed tomatoes 
  • 1 tablespoon of chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon of cumin powder
  • ½ cup of salsa

Directions:

  1. In a large pot, brown turkey with chopped onions
  2. Add beans, tomatoes, garlic, chili powder, cumin and salsa to turkey mixture
  3. Cook until hot
  4. Serve chili with corn bread, cooked rice or on top of a baked potato.
  5. Sprinkle with cheese to taste.

Recipe transcribed from: food.com

 

Blueberry Pancake Smoothie Full of Pregnancy Essentials

Blueberry Pancake Smoothie

Breakfast or dessert-take your pick! This delectable smoothie is not only tasty but full of pregnancy essentials like protein and calcium. Not a fan of blueberries? Swap the blueberries out for strawberries or raspberries for an equally delicious treat.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of reduced-fat milk
  • 2/3 cup of reduced-fat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 ¼ cups of frozen blueberries
  • ½ teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon of ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons of pure maple syrup

Directions:

  1. Place ingredients in blender.
  2. Cover and blend until smooth, about 30 seconds.
  3. Serve and enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: Parents.com

Garlic Chicken Fried Brown Rice

Fried Brown Rice and Chicken

Pregnant and craving some Asian fusion for dinner? Cooking this dish at home is a great way to ensure that all the ingredients are nutritious and delicious for you and your baby-to-be! A great source of fiber, protein, potassium and vitamins A and C, this dish is sure to be a crowd-pleaser for the whole family.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil, divided
  • 8 ounces of boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into strips
  • ½ red bell pepper, chopped
  • ½ cup of green onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 3 cups of cooked, brown rice
  • 2 tablespoons of light soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of rice vinegar
  • 1 cup of frozen peas, thawed

Directions:

  1. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil over medium heat. 
  2. Add chicken, bell pepper, green onion and garlic.
  3. Cook and stir until the chicken is cooked through, approximately 5 minutes.
  4. Remove chicken and set aside. Keep warm.
  5. Heat the remaining oil in the same skillet over medium-high heat and add rice. Cook and stir to heat thoroughly. 
  6. Stir in soy sauce, rice vinegar, peas and continue cooking for 1 minute.
  7. Add chicken back to the skillet and stir to blend with rice. Heat thoroughly. 
  8. Serve and enjoy! 

Recipe transcribed from: allrecipes.com

What You Need to Know About Breastfeeding During Pregnancy

Breastfeeding While Pregnant

If you are pregnant with your second (or third or fourth) or are considering becoming pregnant, you may be wondering about the safety of continuing to breastfeed your baby or toddler throughout your pregnancy. There’s a lot of misinformation about the risks associated with breastfeeding during pregnancy and we want you to have the necessary information to make an informed decision for you, your child and your baby-to-be. Here are the most commonly asked questions about breastfeeding during pregnancy. 

Is it safe for my baby-to-be?

In most normal, healthy pregnancies there is no risk to your unborn baby if you choose to continue breastfeeding your toddler (or baby). A common misconception is that breastfeeding during pregnancy will lead to preterm labor or miscarriage. In actuality, the uterine contractions caused by the release of the hormone oxytocin from breastfeeding are quite mild and no different than the contractions you might experience following sexual intercourse. If you have not been placed on pelvic rest and have a normal, healthy pregnancy, there is no reason why you cannot continue to safely breastfeed as there should be no harm to your developing fetus.

Under what circumstances is it not safe to continue breastfeeding during pregnancy?

It may be advisable to wean your current nursling if you have a high-risk pregnancy for any of the following reasons:

  • You are carrying multiples
  • You have a history of, or are at risk for, preterm labor
  • You have bleeding or pain in your uterus
  • You have been placed on pelvic rest
  • You have been identified as high-risk for any other reason that may make breastfeeding dangerous for you or your developing baby

These reasons alone do not mean you must stop breastfeeding at once but it is important that you discuss it with your healthcare provider who may advise that weaning is the safest option for you and your baby.

Are there any risks to my current nursling if I continue to breastfeed during pregnancy?

Fortunately, the amount of pregnancy hormones released into your milk is minimal and pose no risk to your current breastfeeding child. You toddler may find that you milk supply begins to decrease by the fourth or fifth month of your pregnancy or that the taste of the milk begins to change. Because of this, some toddlers and babies who are nursing while mom is pregnant will naturally self-wean. It is important to ensure that your current nursling is receiving adequate nutrition once you experience a drop in your milk supply. Particularly if your baby is under six months and has not begun eating solids or if they are over six months and breastmilk is still their primary source of nutrition, you will want to make sure they are receiving sufficient daily caloric intake.

What will breastfeeding while pregnant be like for me?

While many women go on to successfully breastfeed their baby or toddler through subsequent pregnancies and beyond, there can be some discomfort due to your rising pregnancy hormones. Up to 75 percent of women report having sore nipples during pregnancy which can consequently make breastfeeding painful at times. Some women also report feeling some nausea when their milk lets down but keeping light snacks on hand while nursing can help prevent this discomfort. In addition to making sure your nursling is getting adequate nutrition, it is vital to make sure you are also getting plenty of nutritive calories per day. During the second trimester of pregnancy, the average woman needs to consume an additional 350 calories per day. By the third trimester, it is recommended that you consume an additional 450 calories per day. When you are breastfeeding during pregnancy, in addition to those extra calories, you need to add an additional 500 calories per day for a nursing baby over six months and an additional 650 calories for a nursling under six months of age. A nutritious diet is important during any pregnancy but even more imperative while also breastfeeding your baby or toddler. Aside from a healthy diet, you’ll want to make sure you drink plenty of water and get as much rest as possible. Try laying on your side to nurse your toddler for naps and you may even be able to catch a few zzz’s yourself.

Deciding whether or not to continue breastfeeding during pregnancy is a personal decision that you should make based on your own comfort level and your toddler’s current nursing habits and physical and emotional needs. It also doesn’t have to be an all or nothing decision and you can decide to cut back the number of nursing sessions per day or to limit the amount of time your toddler spends at the breast during each feeding. This may be a good option if you want to continue nursing but are experiencing any discomfort such as sore nipples or nausea.

For questions about breastfeeding during pregnancy, prenatal care, natural birth, and other women’s services, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife or for a tour of our Birth Center. We are here to help you make decisions that work for you and your baby.

Pregnancy Nachos Loaded with Fiber, Calcium, Protein and Folate

Pregnancy Nachos

You probably didn’t think it was possible that someone would recommend nachos as a healthy food while you are pregnant. It sounds just about as likely as your midwife recommending you visit the McDonald’s drive-thru. But, believe it or not, these nachos are actually healthy. Loaded with fiber, calcium, protein and folate, here’s how to feel like you’re cheating without actually cheating.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ounce of corn chips
  • 1/3 cup of kidney beans
  • 2 tablespoons of chopped olives
  • 1/4 cup of shredded reduced-fat cheese
  • 1/2 cup of shredded lettuce of your choice
  • 3/4 cup of chopped tomatoes
  • 1/3 cup of fresh salsa
  • 1/2 cup of non-fat Greek yogurt

Directions:

  1. Layer corn chips with kidney beans, olives and shredded cheese on a baking sheet.
  2. Bake in oven or toaster oven for approximately 10 minutes or until cheese is melted.
  3. Top with shredded lettuce, tomatoes, salsa and Greek yogurt.
  4. Enjoy

Recipe transcribed from: Parents.com
 

 

Curry Egg Salad Wraps

Curry Egg Lettuce Wrap

Choline, Vitamin E and folate are just a few of the essential prenatal nutrients that you will find in this tasty variation of a lunch time classic. Want to add some carbohydrates and fiber? Simply modify the recipe to include whole grain toast in lieu of lettuce leaves.

Ingredients:

  • 6 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons of nonfat Greek yogurt
  • 3 tablespoons of light mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon of curry powder
  • Pinch of salt and pepper
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • ¼ cup of finely chopped radishes
  • 2 tablespoons of finely chopped red onion
  • ¼ cup of sunflower seeds
  • ¼ cup of chopped fresh parsley (or dill, chives or cilantro)
  • 8 large Bibb, Boston or Butter lettuce leaves

Directions:

  1. Place eggs in a medium saucepan and cover with 1 inch of cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat. When water reaches a boil, immediately cover saucepan, remove from heat and let sit for 12 minutes.
  2. Remove eggs from saucepan and place in ice water for 3 minutes. When cool, rinse under cold water and peel. Chop eggs coarsely.
  3. Stir together Greek yogurt, mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, salt, pepper and curry powder in a large bowl and add chopped eggs once blended.
  4. Add the celery, radishes, red onion, parsley, and sunflower seeds and blend everything together. 
  5. Divide egg mixture among lettuce leaves and roll to create wraps.
  6. Serve and enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: fitPREGNANCY

Miscarriage: Common Concerns & Questions

Photo by monkeybusinessimages/iStock / Getty Images

Pregnancy following a miscarriage can feel like a rollercoaster of emotions. While miscarriages are unfortunately quite common, occurring in approximately 10-20 percent of pregnancies, they can often make the miracle of pregnancy feel like it’s lost some of its innocence. An experience that was once only filled with excitement and joy is now riddled with anxiety, questions, lingering grief and doubts. Here are some common concerns and questions you may have if you are trying to get pregnant again following a miscarriage.

Why did it happen to me? 

One of the most difficult aspects of having a miscarriage can be the feeling of not understanding why it happened. Having answers or a reason why something has happened can sometimes make it easier to accept and move forward. With miscarriages, there is often no explanation, leaving the parents feeling bewildered and distraught. In most cases, miscarriages occur because the fetus is not developing properly or there is a chromosomal abnormality. The abnormalities occur by chance as the embryo develops and have nothing to do with anything you did or did not do during or before your pregnancy. It is rare that a miscarriage happens due to something inherently wrong with the mother’s health or habits. Typically, in these uncommon cases there is an existing health condition such as poorly controlled diabetes or an undiagnosed uterine problem. More often than not, the cause is unknown.

Will it happen again? 

Because most miscarriages are typically due to unexplained and random chromosomal abnormalities, your chances of having another miscarriage remain about the same as your previous pregnancy: between 10 and 20 percent. However, only approximately 2 percent of women have two miscarriages in a row, so you can take comfort in knowing that the chances of this occurring are rare. Most women fortunately go on to have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. 

Is there anything I can do to prevent it? 

Unfortunately, because miscarriages are often due to random chromosomal abnormalities or the fetus not developing properly, there is usually nothing that can be done to prevent their occurrence. However, there are measures that you can take prior to and during pregnancy to help ensure a healthy, full-term pregnancy for you and baby. These include:

  • Starting a regular prenatal vitamin regimen several months prior to trying to conceive
  • Eliminating unhealthy habits like smoking, alcohol, recreational drug use and excessive caffeine consumption before trying to get pregnant
  • Maintaining a healthy weight and eating a nutritious and balanced diet
  • Avoiding risky activities, contact sports and other scenarios in which you might experience abdominal trauma.

Am I ready to be pregnant again? 

This is a question that only you (and your partner) can truly answer. Miscarriages can be physically and emotionally trying and allowing yourself time to grieve the loss of your baby is an important step towards healing. It is not uncommon to feel sadness, anger, confusion, and even guilt following the loss of a pregnancy. Take the time necessary to process your grief, whatever that time frame may be.

How long do I need to wait before trying to get pregnant again?

Following a miscarriage, it’s not uncommon to be wondering when you can try to get pregnant again. For many women, the urge to become pregnant again with a viable pregnancy becomes quite strong following a loss. If you are eager to conceive again after your miscarriage, talk to your doctor or midwife to determine when it is safe for you to try again. Typically, you will be advised not to have sex for two weeks following the miscarriage to prevent infection. If you do not experience any complications, your period should return within six weeks and your cycle should return to normal. Although many doctors and midwives will advise you to wait one or two menstrual cycles before trying to conceive, some research suggests that there is no medical need to wait. 

What will I do if it happens again?

If you do experience more than one miscarriage, it is a good idea to ask your doctor or midwife about having additional testing done to rule out any underlying medical issues that may be causing them to occur. This may include hormone imbalances, uterine fibroids, obstructions in the fallopian tubes, autoimmune disorders and other medical issues affecting fertility and pregnancy. Tests that your doctor or midwife might order include bloodwork, ultrasounds, chromosomal tests, and other exams and procedures to rule out problems with uterus, cervix and fallopian tubes.

How can I process the grief I’m experiencing?

It’s not uncommon to feel alone in your grief following a miscarriage as they are unfortunately often not a subject that is openly discussed. Particularly if the loss occurred before you had shared the news of your pregnancy with family and friends, you might feel as though you have no one to turn to as you process your grief. The grief that accompanies the loss of a pregnancy should not be experienced alone. Reach out to friends and family members who can support you during this time and who may have even experienced loss themselves. Seek out online support forums for women who have experienced a miscarriage to connect and hear stories of hope and future pregnancies. Let your partner know how they can best support you during this time whether it’s simply through listening or through creating some sort of small memorial honoring your baby in your home. Talk, write, cry, listen, hug and grieve as long as you need to in order to move past this difficult time in your life.

Trying to conceive and becoming pregnant following a miscarriage can be a scary and confusing journey. Take comfort in knowing that most women will go on to have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies following a miscarriage. For more information about coping with loss, pregnancy, natural birth, the postpartum period and infant care, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife. We would love to support you in your journey.

Green Tea Poached Salmon with Buckwheat and Lemon Basil Oil

Poached Salmon Salad

Looking for a light, flavorful and healthy option to satisfy your pregnant appetite? Loaded with DHA, magnesium and fiber, this salmon dish is the perfect nutritious meal for the expectant mama. 

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons of loose-leaf green tea or 3 green tea bags
  • 4 slices of fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon of whole black peppercorns
  • 1 cup of kasha buckwheat
  • ½ cup of fresh basil
  • Juice of ½ of a lemon
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1/3 cup of extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt
  • 1 pound of wild salmon filet, sliced into quarters
  • 1 fennel (anise) bulb, thinly sliced
  • 1 green onion, thinly sliced
  • Lemon wedges

Directions:

  1. Bring 5 cups of water to a boil in a large saucepan. Place green tea, ginger and peppercorns in the pan, turn off heat and let steep for 10 minutes.
  2. In a medium saucepan, bring 6 cups of water to a boil. Add buckwheat and reduce heat to a simmer for 5 minutes or until tender. Drain and set aside.
  3. Mix basil, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice and salt in a blender or food processor until well mixed.
  4. Use a slotted spoon to remove solids from tea pan. Place salmon in tea broth and bring to a slight simmer. Cook for 8 minutes or until salmon is opaque and flaky. Adjust heat as needed.
  5. Break up salmon with a fork once cooked and toss with fennel, buckwheat and green onion in a large bowl. 
  6. Divide among plates and drizzle with basil dressing.
  7. Serve with lemon wedges and enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: fitPREGNANCY

Nutrient-Rich Avocado Chocolate Mousse Desert

Avocado Chocolate Mousse Desert

Avocados have been called the pregnancy superfood and now you can even have them for dessert! This delectable Avocado Chocolate Mousse is rich in potassium and folate, both which are essential in pregnancy. This recipe feels like an indulgent treat but has the added bonus of being packed with pregnancy approved nutrients!

  • 2 large avocados, flesh scooped out
  • 1 large ripe banana
  • 1/3 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ¼ cup of coconut milk
  • ¼ cup of pure maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon of grated orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract or chocolate extract
  • ½ teaspoon of ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon of chili powder or cayenne powder (optional)
  • Pinch of sea salt

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender and blend until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed.
  2. Serve immediately or place mousse in an airtight container to save for up to 2 days. 
  3. Serve in bowls garnished with your choice of berries.
  4. Enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: fit PREGNANCY

Pregnancy Protein Muffins

Healthy Protein Muffins

Keeping healthy snacks handy when you’re pregnant is a great way to stay energized and beat the bouts of nausea. It can even be wise to keep a snack on your bedside table at night to munch on before you get up in the morning. These pregnancy protein muffins are a nutritious and yummy snack that will help you meet your necessary 3-4 servings of protein per day. 

Ingredients:

  • 10 egg whites
  • 1 cup of unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 cup of oatmeal
  • 1 scoop of organic vanilla protein powder
  • Cinnamon to taste
  • Vanilla Extract
  • Optional: Fresh berries, dried berries, almonds, walnuts or pecans.

Directions: 

  1. Mix all ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Scoop mixture into nonstick muffin tin.
  3. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes.
  4. Allow to cool before serving.
  5. Enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: Michelle Marie Fit