Vitamins

Red and Green Veggie Frittata

Veggie Frittata

Feeling bored with your usual breakfast? Whether you’re pregnant, hoping to be pregnant or postpartum, this Red and Green Frittata is loaded with essential nutrients like protein, fiber, calcium, Vitamin C and potassium. The best part is this recipe should leave you with leftovers for lunch!

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups of bite-size broccoli florets
  • 8 large eggs
  • ¼ cup of milk
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt
  • ¼ teaspoon of freshly ground pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into ¼ inch thick slices
  • 1 cup of grated white cheddar or fontina cheese, divided
  • 4 tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese, divided
  • 2 teaspoons of olive oil

Directions:

  1. In a large pot, bring water to a boil. Add broccoli and cook until tender for approximately 2 minutes. Drain well.
  2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Whisk eggs, milk, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Stir in broccoli, red pepper, ¾ cup of cheddar cheese and 3 tablespoons of Parmesan cheese.
  3. Heat oil in a 12-inch, ovenproof, nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Pour egg mixture into pan and reduce heat. Cook for 3 minutes to set the bottom on the frittata. 
  4. Sprinkle top with remaining ¼ cup of cheddar and 1 tablespoon of Parmesan cheese.
  5. Transfer pan to oven and bake until the frittata is set and appears slightly puffed up. Approximately 15 minutes.
  6. Allow to cool for 5 minutes in the pan and then loosen edge with a spatula. Slide onto large plate and cut into wedges.
  7. Serve warm and enjoy!

Recipe transcribed from: the BUMP

A Road Map for Moms: Beating Stress and Overcoming Fatigue

Dr. Amy Johnson-Grass

Don’t skip breakfast!

Starting your day with breakfast is a quick and easy way to jump-start your metabolism. Eat something within 30 minutes of getting up.  Make sure to get in 12-15 grams of protein with your breakfast. This could be:

  • A protein shake with fruit and greens
  • Eggs, veggies and whole grain toast
  • Greek yogurt and fruit

-> Check out our blog for great recipe ideas!

Be Mindful of Meals and Snacks!

Moving forward from breakfast, make sure you have protein with each meal and snack. It is important to stick to 3 meals and 2-3 snacks per day. Here are some great, healthy protein options:

Source

Amount

Grams of Protein

Fish, cold, deep water

1 ounce

7g

Turkey – organic

1 ounce

7g

Tofu

½ cup

10g

Whole Beans

½ cup

7g

Quinoa

½ cup

11g

Brown Rice

½ cup

3g

Yogurt

1 cup

8-14g

Egg, whole

1

7g

Nuts

¼ cup

8g

Stay hydrated!

Drink 80 ounces of water daily. Adding lemon or lime to your water is a great way to make it a little more interesting! Hold yourself accountable and purchase a reusable water bottle and keep track of how many you have to drink each day to reach your goal.

Basic Supplements to keep on hand!

Multivitamin: Try and find a food-based multi. These are easy to digest and absorb.

B complex: B vitamins have an important role. They help convert our food into fuel for our body, providing more energy throughout the day.

Adrenal Support: Continued stress causes fatigue of our adrenal system. There are many ways to help keep the adrenal system strong and well supported. Some examples include: Vitamin C, Magnesium and B vitamins. There are also a few herbs that are helpful but my favorite is Rhodiola Rosea, which can be taken as a capsule or tincture.

Fish Oil: Fish oil supports healthy cholesterol levels and also is a great mood booster!

Vitamin D3: When choosing a Vitamin D3 supplement, it should have at least 5,000 IU. Not only does healthy levels of Vitamin D3 help maintain a health immune system, it is also another great vitamin to help with mood.

Get Your Labs Checked!

These basic labs are so important to keep on top of as a woman. They are frequently missed so be sure to ask your doctor the following:

  • Iron (hemoglobin, ferritin)
  • Vitamin D3
  • B12
  • Thyroid

Schedule Some “ME” Time!

This is easier said than done but it will make a huge difference! It doesn’t even have to be more than 30 minutes. Some days take longer breaks if you can, other days you may only get 5 minutes of deep breathing. Here are some examples of things you can do to relieve stress:

  • Exercise. Yoga is a wonderful way to calm your body down and rejuvenate.
  • Reading. Grab a book or magazine find a quiet place and let the world round you melt away for a little while.
  • Laugh. Get a few girls together and have an hour or two of fun and laughter. It does wonders.
  • Take a bath. Buy some Epsom salt and your favorite essential oil and take a 15-minute bath before bed.

Sleep!

Try and get to bed by 10pm every night. Having a full 8 hours of rest is ideal

 

Don't miss Dr. Amy Johnson-Grass next Sunday, September 11 at 11:00am on the Mom Show with my Talk 107.1. The topic is A Road Map for Moms: Beating Stress and Overcoming Fatigue. 

Red Lentils with Sweet Potato and Apricots

Red Lentils

Want to increase your milk supply, combat fatigue and get a large dose of your daily vitamins all in one serving? Try this delicious, Moroccan-inspired stew complete with vitamins A and C, potassium, and complex carbohydrates. Apricots are also known for increasing your body’s prolactin production which is the hormone responsible for signaling your body to make more milk. Another great benefit of this dish? Purée the leftovers and make baby food!

  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1 cup of chopped onion
  • ½ teaspoon of ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon of ground cinnamon
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1 cup of red lentils
  • 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into half-inch cubes
  • ½ cup of chopped dried apricots
  • 1 teaspoon of grated fresh ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt
  • ¼ cup of fresh cilantro

Instructions:

  1. Heat oil in a medium pot over medium heat. Fry onion for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring frequently or until browned. 
  2. Add cumin and cinnamon and sauté for one minute or until spices are fragrant.
  3. Add water, lentils, sweet potato and dried apricots. Bring to a boil, cover pot and simmer over medium heat for 20 minutes or until sweet potato is tender and lentils have broken down completely. 
  4. Add ginger and salt and simmer for two minutes.
  5. Serve over rice and garnish with cilantro

** To create baby food from the leftovers, set aside one cup of mixture prior to adding ginger and salt and puree in a food processor.

Recipe transcribed from: Today's Parent

 

The Quick Guide to Natural Childbirth

Natural Birth

If you have decided on or are considering birthing in a setting like a freestanding birth center, it perhaps has to do in part with your desire to have a natural birth experience. It is estimated that approximately 85 percent of childbearing women are considered low-risk and are great candidates for a natural birth. But what is a natural birth exactly and what does it entail? Are there really worthwhile benefits to it and how much pain will I experience? These are all important questions when considering your birth plan. Here are the whos, whats, wheres and whys of the choice of natural birth.

What is a natural birth?

Natural birth is a vaginal birth that is free of pain medication and has minimal, if any, medical interventions. With a natural birth, the mother is in control of the labor process; she is a part of each and every decision, including when it’s time to rest, change positions and push, with her care providers acting as support throughout the process. 

Why do women choose to have a natural birth?

There are many reasons women choose to have a natural birth. Whether you are expecting your first baby or had a past birth experience that left you wanting to try something different, here are a few of the top reasons moms choose natural birth:

  • To have a sense of control over the birthing process
  • They view birth as a natural, normal, non-medical event
  • To have a sense of presence and awareness during birth
  • To have the ability to move about freely during labor
  • To have the ability to follow the lead of your body’s natural instincts
  • Less invasive
  • To avoid unnecessary medical interventions
  • To avoid undesirable side effects of pain medication to mom and baby (such as drowsiness, a drop in blood pressure or nausea)
  • To avoid undesirable side effects of pain medication on labor (such as slowing or stopping the progress)
  • A sense of empowerment
  • Reduced risk of certain interventions such as the use of synthetic oxytocin (Pitocin), forceps and vacuum extraction
  • The ability to eat and drink throughout labor

Where do women have natural births?

While you can absolutely have a natural birth in a hospital setting with the right supportive team and a clear birth plan, you might find that a birth center is more conducive to your goal of a natural delivery (It is important to note that some hospitals call their labor & delivery units "birth centers"...this is not what we are referring to). Birth centers place a strong emphasis on empowering women to realize the amazing capabilities of their own bodies without intervention or pain medicine. Another option for natural birth is having your baby in your own home. This approach typically includes the attendance and care of a midwife. 

Who can have a natural birth and who attends them?

As previously stated, approximately 85 percent of women are considered great candidates for a natural, vaginal delivery. However, in order to plan for a natural delivery, a woman should ideally have a low-risk pregnancy with few complications or other existing serious conditions. 

A natural birth can be attended by a doctor or midwife, along with a birth assistant and a doula, depending on your setting and personal preferences. Continuous care and support from a midwife or doula throughout labor has been associated with lower rates of the use of pain medicine, incidence of C-sections and other interventions in addition to shorter labors and greater overall satisfaction with the birth experience.

How do women cope with the pain of a natural birth?

Every woman will experience the pain of childbirth differently. Fortunately, there are many alternative forms of pain management that can be used during a natural birth instead of medication or an epidural. Here are just a few of them:

Nitrous oxide for Labor Pain
  • Nitrous oxide
  • Water immersion/water birth
  • Massage
  • Relaxation
  • Acupressure
  • Acupuncture
  • Visualization
  • Hot/cold compresses
  • Hydrotherapy
  • Deep breathing
  • Yoga
  • Changing positions
  • Distraction
  • Visual imagery
  • Meditation
  • Walking
  • Hypnosis
  • Birthing ball

Consider taking child birth preparedness classes that focus on natural birth and pain management. The better prepared you are, the more tools you will have to help you achieve your goal of a natural birth.

What if something goes wrong?

The most important thing with any birth plan is to approach it with flexibility and a willingness to heed the advice of your caregivers who have you and your baby’s best interest at heart. While having a natural birth is typically very safe, complications do arise occasionally where medical interventions are not only suggested but necessary. Beginning with a caregiver that you trust is an important step to helping you feel confident and comfortable in the event that a change is made to the plan involving unexpected interventions. Just know that no matter what course your birth ends up taking, whether it is perfectly natural or ends in a C-section, you and your body have done an incredible, life-giving thing. There is no shame in a birth that does not go as planned.

For questions about natural birth, prenatal and postpartum care and all other women’s care services, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife and for a tour of our Birth Center. Our goal is to support you in realizing your body’s tremendous strength and potential.

Vitamin B-12 Injections: Use, Deficiency, Risks, & B-12 In Pregnancy

Vitamin b12 Injections

Vitamin B-12 injections are a great way to bridge any nutritional gaps in your diet and ensure that you are receiving what you need. Hydroxocobalamin is a natural form of Vitamin B-12 that can be administered via injection to improve energy levels, aid in red blood cell development and help maintain a healthy central nervous system. Here’s everything you need to know about Vitamin B-12 injections.

Recommended Dosage:

For adults over the age of 14, the recommended daily intake of Vitamin B-12 is 2.4 mcg. During pregnancy, the recommended amount increases to 2.6 mcg and when breastfeeding, to 2.8 mcg. Vitamin B-12 can be found in many foods, including meat, fish, eggs, poultry and milk and also in your prenatal multivitamin.

Vitamin B Deficiency:

While only 1-1.5 percent of Americans have a true deficiency, as many as 40 percent fall within the low-normal range for Vitamin B levels. Symptoms that may indicate low Vitamin B levels include fatigue, depression, low blood pressure, constipation, memory loss, weakness, sore tongue, tingling and numbness in fingers and toes, mood changes and difficulty walking. In more severe cases, a Vitamin-B deficiency can result in nerve damage, anemia and stomach complications.

Who’s At Risk?

Certain populations are at a higher risk for deficient and low levels of Vitamin B-12. These groups include vegetarians, vegans, and persons with pernicious anemia, gastrointestinal disorders and alcohol abuse problems. The increased risk for these populations is due to low levels of consumption and difficulty with vitamin absorption. 

Is it Possible to Have Too Much Vitamin B-12?

Fortunately, Vitamin B-12 is a water soluble vitamin that will be naturally eliminated by the body when the amount needed is exceeded. Because of this, taking more than the recommended dosage of Vitamin B-12 will neither help nor harm you unless you have an actual problem with deficiency. Toxicity is not a risk. 

The Shot:

The Vitamin B-12 shot has been shown to be effective at treating a deficiency, boosting energy and in some cases lessening symptoms of depression and improving cognitive function. The injection is given directly into the muscle, typically in the thigh or upper arm. The dose administered is dependent on the condition and can be tailored in frequency and amount based on the patient’s response. Common side effects associated with the B-12 shot include soreness at the injection site, diarrhea, swelling and itching. If you experience side effects from the shot, adjusting the dosage can be effective at reducing the occurrence. Serious and rarer side effects can include muscle cramping, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, slurred speech, vision changes, chest pain and weakness on one side of the body. Call your doctor or midwife immediately should you experience any of these more serious side effects. 

Vitamin B-12 in Pregnancy:

Vitamin B-12 is particularly important during pregnancy as it not only helps to regulate mom’s nervous system and red blood cell formation but also helps fight defects of baby’s spine and central nervous system. Also, because the Hydroxocobalamin version of the B-12 shot is a natural form of the vitamin, it is perfectly safe to receive during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Moms who are strict vegetarians or vegans and are breastfeeding are at a higher risk for Vitamin B-12 deficiency. 

For more about essential vitamins and nutrients during pregnancy, check out this article. If you’re interested in learning more about the benefits of the Vitamin B-12 injection, contact Health Foundations to speak with one of our midwives. We offer the B-12 injections at the Birth Center in addition to many other health and wellness services for women. For questions about B-12 injections, pregnancy, natural birth and other women’s care matters, contact Health Foundations for a free consultation with a midwife and for a tour of our Birth Center.